Chandigarh

Managing monsoon in Chandigarh

June 27, 2017 06:15 AM

Chandigarh : Monsoon showers are likely to hit the city this week. Now, the bad one: The rain is going to make life difficult for the residents. Reason: the Municipal Corporation is yet to fast-track the work of cleaning the sewerage and drainage system.

Faulty level of several newly laid roads, such as the slip road from the Sector 17/16 bus stand round about, also leads to water logging and traffic jams. Interestingly, the new roads are more prone to getting inundated than the old ones due to poor levelling. How the authorities plan to rectify this fault is the big question.

A survey has found that 17,000 road gullies (drainage inlets of storm water) on the internal roads of the sectors are blocked, a sure-shot recipe for waterlogging. With the MC dragging its feet, these are not expected to be cleared before the heavens open.

The torrential pre-monsoon showers last week demonstrated that the Storm Water Drainage system (SWD) has failed as the roads turned into rivulets after only an hour or two of heavy downpour.

Water on the roads is damaging as it erodes the macadam and causes potholes. It can also lead to the road caving in if it seeps into the soil .

Nestled in the foothills of the Shivalik range, Chandigarh is drained by two seasonal rivulets-Sukhna choe in the east and Patiala-ki-Rao choe in the west. Its central part has two minor streams, called Natural choe and nalla (it starts in Sector 29).

The main reason is that storm water of Sectors 10, 16, 23, 36, 42 and 52 is disposed of in Natural choe, which originates in Sector 3 and passes through these sectors before entering SAS Nagar. During heavy rains, this choe starts overflowing and storm water drains in these sectors remain blocked till the water recedes in the choe. Similarly, storm water drainage from the Press Chowk in Sector 18 to Sector 52 also flows into the Natural choe in Sector 52. A heavy downpour that floods the choe has a cascade effect on the drains, which start overflowing.

Faulty level of several newly laid roads, such as the slip road from the Sector 17/16 bus stand round about, also leads to water logging and traffic jams. Interestingly, the new roads are more prone to getting inundated than the old ones due to poor levelling. How the authorities plan to rectify this fault is the big question.

"I blame waterlogging on faulty underground drain pipes. The existing road gullies are too wide and end up getting blocked with filth. They also encroach upon the pedestrian pathways. But the drain pipes are too narrow to accommodate the rain water accumulated on roads. The diametre of the existing pipes must be increased three to four times, only then can we expect total clearance of rainwater from roads." Former joint director, TBRL, Sateesh Dadwal

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